Its Over!

How rude, no one replied to the department!

“Your application is therefore deemed refused.”

Your application is therefore deemed refused.

Your application is therefore deemed refused.

2016-08-05-CALNI-ITS-OVER

Department for

liifrastmcture

AnRofnn

The Graham Bolton Planning Partnership Limited

Omward Buildings

207 Deansgate

Manchester

M3 3NW

BonneagaiF

wwwJnfrastnicture-ni.govitk

Dfl Strategic Planning Division

Clarence Court

10-18 Adelaide Street

Belfast

BT2 8GB

Date:

Your Ref:

Our Ref:

Please

Contact:

Sth August 2016

05/2332

S/2008/0630/F

(Please quote at all times)

Nola Jamieson

Contact

Number

028 9054 0536

Dear Sir/Madam,

Location: Land approximately 190m south west of 29 Ballyvannon Road and 30m

north east of 21 Ballyvannon Road, Glenavy, Crumlin, Co. Antrim

Proposal: Biomass fuelled power plant

The above planning application was received on 4th June 2008.

On 31st March 2014 the Department requested Further Environmental Information under

Regulation 15(1) of the Planning (Environmental impact Assessment) Regulations

(Northem Ireland) 1999. Regulation 15 2(A) states that the information must be submitted

within three months from the date of the request or such extended period as may be

agreed in writing between the applicant and the Department. If not so submitted the

application shall be deemed to be refused. No information has been received by the

Department following your request for an extension of time until 31®* July 2016.

Your application is therefore deemed refused.

You should note that a deemed refusal shall not give rise to an appeal to the Planning

Appeals Commission, under Section 58 (appeals) or Section 60 (appeal against failure to

take planning decision) of the Planning Act (Northem Ireland) 2011.

Yours faithfully

for Strategic Planning Division

The Graham Bolton Planning Partnership Limited

Omward Buildings

207 Deansgate

Manchester

M3 3NW

Department for

Infirastructure

AnRoInn

Bonneagair

www.fiastfucture-ni.gov.uk

Dfl Strategic Planning Division

Clarence Court

10-18 Adelaide Street

Belfast

BT2 8GB

Date:

YourRef:

Our Ref:

Please

Contact:

5th August 2016

05/2332

S/2009/0579/F

(Please quote at all times)

Nola Jamieson

Dear Sir/Madam,

Contact

Number

028 9054 0536

Location: Land adj Lough Neagh west of 20 Shore Rd, 20 Shore Rd to junction of

Shore Rd/lngrams Rd, length of Ingrams Rd, junction of

Ingrams/Ballyvannon Rd to site of proposed Biomass power

piant,190m SW of 29 Baliyvannon Rd &30m NE of 21Bailyvannon Rd

Glenavy

Proposal: Water abstraction facility and water pipeline

The above planning application was received on 12th June 2009.

On 31st March 2014 the Department requested Further Environmental Information under

Regulation 15(1) of the Planning (Environmental Impact Assessment) Regulations

(Northem Ireland) 1999. Regulation 15 2(A) states that the information must be submitted

within three months from the date of the request or such extended period as may be

agreed in writing between the applicant and the Department. If not so submitted the

application shali be deemed to be refused. No information has been received by the

Department following your request for an extension of time until 31st July 2016.

Your application is therefore deemed refused.

You should note that a deemed refusal shall not give rise to an appeal to the Planning

Appeals Commission, under Section 58 (appeals) or Section 60 (appeal against failure to

take planning decision) of the Planning Act (Northem Ireland) 2011.

Yours faithfully

Authorised Officer

 

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Pandoras Box, understanding history and hope for a better future.

CALNI march on Stormont

CALNI Chairman Danny Moore wrote the below post for the Compromise After Conflict blog. It is reproduced here with their permission.

One of the most moving moments of my life came in the run up to Christmas 2009. At the time our local community was embroiled in an intense campaign to stop the Rose Energy Incinerator planning application.

On Christmas eve, my aunt, then in her late 70s (now deceased) and three of her friends, all widows, came down to our house to donate £100 each to the CALNI campaign from their pension payments. I was humbled, obviously, and asked them to reconsider, but they insisted. They acknowledged that their contributions were a drop in the ocean, but they wanted and needed to be part of the movement. They’d seen the damage that pollution from the Ulster Farm By-Products (UFBP) rendering plant had done to our community and wanted a better future for the younger generation, one without a poultry litter incinerator towering in our midst.

Our particular battle was focussed on protecting the community and Lough Neagh ecosystem from the risk of pollution for the next fifty years. The backdrop was that we lived in the shadow (or more correctly stench) of the UFBP rendering plant since the 1950s. If anything the environmental impact of the plant seemed to only get worse as time passed, until after the Millennium when it held the position of Northern Ireland’s top polluter, based on the number of complaints from the local community and various other measures.

This pollution has now stopped, not least as a consequence of resolute community action. Though as time passes and we learn more about the impact of environmental pollutants on human health I’ve no doubt that there will be a legacy of problems in our area for years to come.

As with all communities in Northern Ireland the community living around the shores of Lough Neagh in Glenavy was profoundly scarred by the troubles, beginning with a series of tit for tat terrorist acts in the early 70s. Before that the area had been relatively harmonious, but for almost 40 years the troubles drove a wedge between many people and families who had been close friends for decades before, whose parents and grand parents had worked together. This underlying fracture and change in community demographic was further compounded by the migration of thousands of people from West Belfast into Crumlin and Glenavy.

The threat of the Rose Energy Incinerator and CALNI campaign had a profound healing effect on our community. The presence of a common enemy, and working together to resist a common enemy can be a powerful unifying force. Within a few months of the start of the campaign, my Dad, who is also in his 70s came into the house as a car drove up the lane. He remarked, “that man and I were friends once, but he hasn’t been in our yard since July 1970”. As the campaign developed everyone began to pull in the same direction, John Farr the Minister and Parish Priest Fr Sean Dillon both gave their full support, as did the representatives of all the political parties, “blow-ins” including Sir George Bain and many other people who were new to the area. By Christmas 2009 Dr Peter Fitzgerald and Randox became heavily involved behind the scenes.

As can be seen from the picture at Stormont, Politicians from all the local parties (with the notable exception of the TUV) rallied around the cause and worked tirelessly on our behalf, in a seemingly endless stream of petitions, assembly questions, motions and debates, press releases, rallies and public meetings. Candidates for all the local parties (and the Conservative candidate) pledged support ahead of both the Assembly and Westminster elections. The community were hosted in Stormont a number of times at the invitation of Thomas Burns, Jeffrey Donaldson and Mitchel McLaughlin. Aside from the community issue, the use of “Incineration” anywhere in NI was itself a key manifesto issue for the SDLP and Sinn Fein. The SDLP went so far as to specifically include objection to the Rose Energy Incinerator in their election manifesto.

Few issues unite all the political parties in Northern Ireland, but this was one did, at least at a local level.

In talking with all these people, in particular the older generation, it became clear that while a common enemy had brought us together, to focus on the common enemy was to miss the point. Our group was driven by hope and the desire for a better future for the young. As is clear from the picture above, both Orange and Green, and those in between, rallied around this cause and continue to do so today. Bringing the community to Stormont that day was a tremendous moment. It gave everyone involved a sense of ownership of the campaign but more importantly, it allowed people to recognise that devolution had brought local accountability, that local communities could play a role in their own destinies, that there was hope for the future.

Many of the older people, or their parents, were involved in the original campaign to block the Glenfarm planning application in the late 1940s – a plant that was broadly opposed at the time. That application was pushed through amongst skulduggery in a Lisburn Council meeting on a night when the Glenavy Councillors had been instructed to stay at home. There was uproar, but to no avail, and almost 60 years of stench and pollution followed.

With this backdrop, the pensioners understood that we had to fight and win, because if we didn’t there would be a legacy of pollution for the next 50 years; but even then they were driven by hope, hope for a better future in the area for their grand children, hope that this time is was different and we could with, hope that this time their voices would be heard. The force that actually united everyone was that most basic of human desires, the hope that we leave the world in a better place for our children and generations to come.

The CALNI campaign and the history behind it can be a metaphor for many issues in Northern Ireland. While it is important to fully understand the past with all the wrongs, skulduggery, and suffering we can all have a common goal, a better future for our children. We can all work together.

— Best, Danny

Footnote:

History has a way of repeating itself. Community action didn’t stop the original application getting approved in the 1940s, and ultimately the most vociferous objection campaign ever in Northern Ireland didn’t stop Rose Energy.

This time around, Edwin Poots, the environment Minister (and ironically also a Lisburn Councillor) indicated that he was “minded to approve” the application at the end of August 2011. Understanding the history, we (the community) expected that outcome and were prepared. We took decisive action bringing Poots’ interim decision to the JR Courts within a couple of days and critically before the final paperwork could be issued. In doing this we ultimately stalled the process in the hope a new Minister would see it differently and make the right decision. Alex Atwood refused the application in December 2012, though Rose Energy may still appeal through the PAC.

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Environment Minister rejects controversial

Press Release – Communities Against the Lough Neagh Incinerator (CALNI)

21/12/2013

The Communities Against the Lough Neagh Incinerator (CALNI) has today welcomed the decision by the Minister for the Environment to reject outright the hugely controversial planning application for the proposed £100million Rose Energy waste incinerator on the shores of Lough Neagh.

Speaking following the announcement, CALNI President Danny Moore said today:

“We’d like to commend the Minister for this brave decision and congratulate the people of Glenavy for their perseverance in the face of great odds and at times, overwhelming special and commercial interests. This is a decision that will not only impact the people of Glenavy today but the local community for generations to come. It’s a victory for the rights of the community and ordinary everyday people.

“Not only is it a brave decision from Minister Attwood but it is the correct one. This is on record as the most controversial planning application in Northern Ireland with almost 7,000 letters of objection against it – the highest number of objections ever submitted against a planning application in Northern Ireland. Objections have also been made by prominent local employers such as Randox Laboratories in Crumlin. In recent months, both the European Commission and officials from the Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (DARD) have rejected the proposal as viable option with both bodies contending that a waste incinerator was no longer the best option to deal with poultry manure when better, scientifically-proven alternatives exist.

CALNI Chairman, Ray Clarke added:

“This is the end of a five-year battle and a very welcome Christmas present for the people of Glenavy. I would like to wholeheartedly thank those that worked tirelessly behind the scenes to make this day possible and those who have supported this campaign both here in Northern Ireland and further afield.”

“We firmly believe that the Minister has taken strong action to protect the South Antrim economy and the current and future jobs in the biotech sector, where Randox is headquartered employing close to a thousand people. We commend his decision on both economic and environmental grounds.”

“We also commend the new initiative to identify an optimal solution to the poultry litter issue recently launched by DARD Minister Michelle O’Neill, DETI Minister Arlene Foster and DoE Minister Attwood.”

Ends//…

Media contact:
Chris Brown, MCE Public Relations
DD: 028 90 267 098
Mobile: 078 0197 3320
Twitter: @CB_PRandPA
Email: chrisbrown@mcepublicrelations.com

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Attwood announces Rose Energy decision – DOE News Release

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

21 December 2012

Environment Minister Alex Attwood is to refuse planning permission for the Rose Energy proposal on the shores of Lough Neagh.

The proposal influencing Co Antrim was for construction of a large scale Energy from Waste facility to incinerate chicken litter in Glenavy in Co Antrim.

Alex Attwood said: “I have carefully interrogated the many issues surrounding this complex planning application. However, I have decided that on balance the environmental and other impacts outweigh the economic arguments.

“I fully accept that the poultry industry is of great importance to the local economy and there is a need to find alternative and sustainable methods of the disposal of waste from the industry. I have met with the Agri-food industry – I will work with the industry to take forward developments and job prospects.

“However economic arguments must be balanced against the protection of the environment and other needs. In my view a facility of this scale should not be located in a sensitive rural location on the shores of Lough Neagh. I am also concerned by the negative impact on the amenity of surrounding dwellings and the wider community as well as a general increase of heavy traffic on rural roads. It is also contrary to current rural planning policy and has impacts on other businesses and industry.

“While accepting a need to deal with waste from the poultry industry I can see no site specific need in relation to this particular location. I stress that I do support the concept of Energy from Waste, but such facilities must be properly located. This proposal is not in the right place.

“I should also make clear that the Rose energy project, even if granted planning permission, would not have assisted in Northern Ireland meeting its EU commitments on Nitrates Action. This is a view shared by senior figures in the agricultural and economic development sectors who have written to me to make this point and to recommend intensive efforts to find alternative solutions.”

Minister Attwood further stated: “In conjunction with the recently announced research competition to find more sustainable methods of disposal I would urge all interested parties to work with DOE. It is important that we find the proper alternative solutions for land spread of poultry waste which reaches the right balance between protecting the environment and meeting the long term needs of the industry in a sustainable manner.”

The Minister concluded: “This application has been in the system since 2008. As with all major planning applications I am determined to clear the backlog after careful consideration of the merits of each case in order to bring certainty to all involved.”

Notes to editors:

1. A planning application for a Biomass Fuelled Power Plant was submitted on 4 June 2008 accompanied by an Environmental Statement. The applicant is Rose Energy Limited.

2. The application seeks full approval for a plant that will be fuelled mostly by poultry bedding with a smaller amount of meat and bone meal (approximately 260,000 tonnes per annum). The power plant is designed generate approximately 30MW of electricity as an output of the incineration process. A connection to the NIE grid does not form part of this planning application.

3. The proposal comprises the main facility structure which is made of a number of buildings including a boiler house (42m high), material intake and holding buildings (14.5m & 24m high), a turbine hall and control room (24m high). It also involves a bank of three 3 cooling towers 15m in height and a chimney 80m in height. Other external structures include an office block, emergency generator, weighbridge, waste water treatment building, ash bag filtration and silo, NIE metering and switch yard, MBM silo, sprinkler tanks and pump house, substation and car parking and circulation areas.

4. Alongside the principal application for the power plant is a separate application for a Water Abstraction facility and associated pipeline. This separate but associated application was received on 12 June 2009 and comprises a sump with pumping equipment and a valve chamber. It is designed to abstract 160 cubic metres of water per hour from Lough Neagh. Waste water is treated, cooled and pumped into the Glenavy River.

5. Both planning applications were designated as major applications under Article 31 of the Planning (NI) Order 1991.

6. The site for the power plant extends to approximately 5 hectares and is located in a rural location close to the shores of Lough Neagh, approximately 2km southwest of Glenavy.

7. The Department has received a significant number of representations in relation to this application. To date there are in excess of 13,000 representations – around 6,400 in support and 6,800 objections. Support is based on employment generation, the need for such a facility to allow the poultry industry to comply with the Nitrates Directive in terms of the disposal of poultry waste and the importance of the poultry industry to the NI economy. Objections to the proposal are on the grounds of its visual impact in a rural location, the impact on residential amenity including noise and disturbance, the impacts on air and water quality and nature conservation and traffic impact. There is also an objection from Randox Laboratories in relation to a perceived adverse impact on their healthcare business in terms of air quality.

8. The Department has been considering further environmental information submitted following a legal challenge by the local objectors group – Campaign Against Lough Neagh Incinerator (CALNI) – launched when the previous Minister announced his intention to approve. Grounds for challenge included policy interpretation and the fact that the grid connection does not form part of the proposal. The legal challenge is being held in abeyance until the Department makes a formal decision.

9. The next step in the process is to issue a Notice of Opinion to Refuse planning permission. Under Article 31 the applicant has 28 days to exercise the right to seek a hearing before the PAC to consider proposed reasons for refusal. If Rose Energy chooses to follow this route the PAC will make a recommendation to the Department on the basis of the evidence presented at the hearing. The final decision rests with the Department.

10. For media enquiries please contact DOE Communications Office 028 9025 6058. Out of office hours, contact the EIS Duty Press Officer on pager 07699 715 440 and your call will be returned.

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Chicken litter incinerator dealt blow by EC – John Manley – Irish News – 25/09/2012

Opponents of the proposed chicken litter-burning incinerator on the shores of Lough Neagh claim the project has been dealt a fatal blow by the European Commission. A spokesman for the commission’s environment committee recently told trade publication Farm Week that an “incineration plant is not a good option to deal with poultry manure as it mean waste of precious nutrients”.

That view is echoed by a section of the North’s farming community, which also believes that burning litter is not the preferred option. Commenting on the statement from the commission, Professor Sir George Bain from the Communities Against the Lough Neagh Incinerator (CALNI) said it “must now sound the death knell for the proposed incinerator. The commission’s opinion states that poultry litter falls under the definition of waste and therefore considers the installation would be a waste incinerator and no longer a good option to deal with poultry manure,” he said.

“The commission has also stated that they have always pushed Northern Ireland and all member states for a more sustainable use of manure, which includes adequate storage and application.” Mr Bain said the commission’s view was a further reason for environment minister Alex Attwood to refuse the application by Rose Energy, a company owned by Brazilian-owned poultry processor Moy Park and animal rendering firm Glenfarm Holdings. The professor said the commission has also indication that no fines were pending in regard to regional water quality.

A spokesman for the Department of the Environment said Rose Energy’s application was in the final stage of consideration and a recommendation would be forwarded to the minister shortly.

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